An analysis of the book the paradoxes of delusion by louis sass

Schizophrenia has nothing to do with split personality. This point of view has developed its own orthodoxy, even if most of us go about our lives as though we were actually involved with things, events and people not entirely of our making.

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The Paradoxes of Delusion: Wittgenstein, Schreber, and the Schizophrenic Mind

A dauntless critic of the illusions of philosophy, Wittgenstein likened the speculative excesses of traditional metaphysics to mental illness. Schizophrenia, Sass demonstrates, is not the loss of rationality, but the far point in the trajectory of a consciousness turned in upon itself.

Sass shatters conventional thinking about insanity by juxtaposing the na Insanity - in clinical practice as in the popular imagination - is seen as a state of believing things that are not true and perceiving things that do not exist.

Most schizophrenics, however, do not act as if they mistake their delusions for reality. Like the philosophical solipsist, the schizophrenic may define his or her own consciousness as the center of the universe - and may experience his or her delusional world as a product of that same consciousness.

Thought processes lose their coherence; emotions are absent altogether or, similarly, fail to cohere. The most intuitive acts become the object of exhaustive scrutiny.

Both books are powerful, lucid and original, and they should revolutionise our thinking about the workings of the human mind. The Paradoxes of Delusion is the shorter and, in the technical sense, more philosophical work.

What schizophrenics experience might, then, be viewed as an extreme version of the mental world of the alienated intellectual.

The delusions of schizophrenics are not failures of reasoning, but of appropriate feeling. Most of us — but not all. These consequences have been explored or expressed in much of the art and philosophy of the late 19th and 20th centuries, in what might be gathered together under the names of Modernism and Post-Modernism.

Everything has to be considered. Sass does not see madness as the simple malfunctioning of reason, nor does he strive, as some have done, to glamorise it as an inspired alternative to reason.

Imagine being so constructed that this excessive consciousness pervaded everything. Schizophrenia, Sass demonstrates, is not the loss of rationality, but the far point in the trajectory of a consciousness turned in upon itself.

The Paradoxes of Delusion

Wittgenstein, Schreber, and the Schizophrenic Mind. Sass is a professor of clinical psychology and Madness and Modernism is rooted in a thorough knowledge of the psychological literature, but he also draws on an extensive acquaintance with 19th and 20th-century art, literature and philosophy.

Most schizophrenics, however, do not act as if they mistake their delusions for reality. Everything has to be broken down into parts.To understand quite how extensive, and how important, the comparison is, you need to read Louis Sass’s wholly fascinating Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature and Thought, and The Paradoxes of Delusion: Wittgenstein, Schreber, and the Schizophrenic Mind.

The Paradoxes of Delusion by Louis A. Sass,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Further, Sass does an excellent job of plunging into the “atmosphere” of schizophrenic experience.

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It’s not so much thinking out what to do, it’s the doing of it that sticks me

Pages and cover are clean and intact. Used items may not include supplementary materials such as CDs or access codes. Louis A. Sass. Published by Harvard University Press. ISBN ISBN 13 The Paradoxes of Delusion. Sass, Louis A. Published by Cornell University Press.

The Paradoxes of Delusion : Wittgenstein, Schreber, and the Schizophrenic Mind

The Paradoxes of Delusion: Wittgenstein, Schreber, and the Schizophrenic Mind [Louis A. Sass] on mint-body.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Insanity―in clinical practice as in the popular imagination―is seen as a state of believing things that are not true and perceiving things that do not exist.

Most schizophrenics/5(2). Schizophrenia, Sass demonstrates, is not the loss of rationality, but the far point in the trajectory of a consciousness turned in upon itself. The Paradoxes of Delusion will be necessary reading for anyone concerned with the preoccupations of modern philosophy and the realities of mental illness.

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An analysis of the book the paradoxes of delusion by louis sass
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